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Final Networked learning post

Overall I would say that the class went very well. Twitter that was nothing to me before the class, became easily my favourite social media outlet. I was able to post many things and also learn from other people’s posts. Any post that I really really liked, I retweeted. Not only because I liked it but also because it was a way to encourage those who posted them. One could go on my Twitter page and see many retweets.

Here are some pictures of some of those retweets:

 

 

 

I also had people retweeting my tweets. which was very encouraging:

 

fullsizeoutput_49f

 

In terms of Google Community, I was not as involved as Twitter, as I was a little bit overwhelmed with the amount of information that was circulating around (social media speaking, I prefer the one on one interaction over the group chats) but once in a while I participated. Nevertheless, I really liked the community because one could ask any question at any time of the day and would get an automatic answer; the amount of solidarity on that group was quite stunning. I was a bit skeptical at the beginning as of whether it would work (organic connections) but at the end of the day it worked. Here below are some examples:

 

 

IMG_0951

 

I also was able to comment and encourage other people on their learning projects, but was also encouraged by others commenting on mine. It was fascinating to see what other people were doing for their learning projects, very good ideas everywhere.

 

My favourite thing group wise was maybe the post that I made with Paige McNabb, it was only the two of us but I really liked it. We talked about the pros and cons of Facebook.

Online social activism

Online social activism according to me can be very powerful, especially here in the Western world. I remember for instance what happened in “United Airlines a few days ago, things went viral on social media and it made a huge difference (United Airlines within 48 hours saw a 3% decrease financially). In other words, the awareness was well raised. In the West it can be very worthwhile and meaningful.

online 2

In other parts of the world though Online Activism  has very small impact. How often have we seen online activism against the North Korean government for instance, or bad treatment of women in some parts of the world? Have things changed though? Not really. I grew up in a country ruled by a “dictatorship  type of goverment, and believe me online social activism is of small impact. So discouraging sometimes.

online 1

Now in regard to conversations about social justice online, they can be very heated. Very rarely have I seen people admitting their mistakes online. It educates people and can be very helpful though, but the common reaction of people has been to argue and complain.

Summary of some of the things I’ve learned

After time of researching and learning, I have not only learnt many Hebrew expressions and words, but I have also been able to know more about their culture and roots. Fascinating language, “the language of the Bible” is both ancient and unique. Having survived centuries of history, it was finally revived as a modern language over 150 years ago, and today is spoken in Israel and beyond. Now more than ever I want to visit Israel and learn more about the language. That process of learning here as I mentioned earlier, is not easy, since I don’t hang around native speakers. Neverthless, here is a summary of some cultural aspects of the language that I have learnt:

  • Hebrew originally was the language of the Bible, was considered as “dead” for 2000 years as the Jewish people were scattered all over the world, then got revived about 150 years ago.  Today the language is spoken by more than 9 million people (with about 250,000 speakers in the States ).

 

  • Hebrew is written from right to left, although their numbers are written from left to right.

 

  •  The Academy of the Hebrew Language decides on new words for the Hebrew language. Hebrew has vowels but they mostly aren’t marked – you have to know how each word is pronounced. First_Committee_of_the_Hebrew_Language_Jerusalem_19122

Here is the first Committee of the Hebrew Language, Jerusalem 1912 (via harvard University Library)

 

  • Hebrew and Arabic  are very very close. No wonder why tradition calls Jewish people and Arabs cousins. Both language are called “Semitic languages”. They might have different scripts, however they do have parallel grammar systems and often similar words (shalom in Hebrew is salam in Arabic. Those words both mean peace and hello). Furthermore, many words in Arabic are used by Hebrew speakers as slang words. Sababa for instance means “great” and mabsut is “satisfied”.

 

Table 2

 

  • Many Hebrew words are commonly spoken and used in many languages like English or Spanish or French: Alleluia for instance means “praise God”, we have other words like Satan, Abracadabra, Amen (so be it)…

Lesson Plan 2 (French)

Nom : Divin Mvoula

Niveau : 5e année

Durée : 1 heure et 15 min

Observateurs : 

Résultat d’apprentissage : 5FE.1 : Approfondir et appliquer sa compréhension de la notion de la mesure linéaire et de mesure de surface (mm, cm, m), y compris estimer, mesurer et déterminer des périmètres et des aires de rectangles;

Indicateurs de réalisation : b) Détermine à l’aide d’outils de mesure, des mesures d’objets dans son environnement ou des distances parcourues (mm, cm et m), y compris des périmètres et des aires et explique sa stratégie pour le faire.

Objectif langagier : l’élève apprendra ou enrichira son vocabulaire lié aux figures géométriques.

Objectif affectif : amener les élèves à quotidiennement prendre conscience des objets autour d’eux qui sont de figure rectangulaire et à peut être penser à leurs périmètres et leurs surfaces.

Amorce : Saluer les élèves puis leur demander où ils sont présentement (ex : à l’école, en salle de classe, dans la cours d’école…). Ensuite leur demander d’identifier certains objets autour d’eux ainsi que leurs figures géométriques respectives, sans pour autant s’adonner à trop de précision (ex : un élève pourrait dire d’un objet trapézoïdal qu’il est triangulaire, mais c’est pas grave).

Étapes de développement : leur faire savoir que pour la leçon du jour on se focalisera sur le rectangle.

Leur demander de prendre leurs crayons et règles après avoir préalablement distribué des feuilles car tous ensemble on tracera des rectangles. L’enseignant qui lui sera au tableau le fera avec eux. Il parlera de la longueur et de la largeur, et de leur rapport. Ensuite il prendra des dimensions quelconques pour la longueur et la largeur, et après avoir construit un rectangle au tableau à titre d’exemple, il demandera aux élèves de faire de même (il leur donnera d’autres mesures/dimensions).

Après qu’ils aient tous tracé leur rectangles et ainsi compris ce que c’est que la longueur et la largeur, leur parler des concepts de périmètres et d’aires. Le périmètre c’est la mesure de la longueur additionnée à celle de la largeur, et le résultat est multiplié par deux. En ce qui concerne l’aire ou la surface c’est la mesure de la longueur multipliée par celle de la largeur.

Montrer un ou deux exemples au tableau.

Clôture :Faire une activité où il leur sera donné des mesures de longueur et de largeur (PowerPoint certainement), et ils auront à construire le rectangle en question sur une feuille, puis calculer le périmètre et la surface.

Stratégie : les élèves feront des exercices

Évaluation : l’objectif sera considéré atteint lorsque la majorité des élèves répondra juste aux questions posées et lorsqu’ils auront cerné la démarche du calcul du périmètre et de la surface (sur papier).

Activité supplémentaire : Donner une activité supplémentaire similaire s’il reste toujours énormément de temps

Ressources : utilisation des règles et crayons.

Lesson Plan 1: Health Ed. Gr.8

      1. Subject/Grade: Health Education/ Gr.8                                            Lesson Title: Impact of residential schools on Indigenous communities today.                                                                            Teacher: Divin Mvoula

      1. Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

 

Outcome(s)/Indicator(s)/Treaty Outcomes and Indicators:

SI82 : Assess the impact residential schools have on First Nations communities.

d) Examine how First Nations and communities continue to deal with and heal from the abuses experienced by First Nation peoples in residential schools.

USC8.4 : Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of violence (including but not limited to emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, spiritual abuse, and neglect) on the well-being of and the supports needed for self, family, and community.

i. Determine that a victim of violence/abuse is never at fault or to blame for the abuse.

Modified indicator: Examine how First Nations and communities continue to deal with and heal from abuses experienced in residential schools and how they are not to blame.

Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

 

Essential Questions:

– Do kids seem excited about the subject

– Are they willing to travel into that uncomfortable zone

– Do they ask questions throughout the class or do they have comments

– How do they respond after the class

– Are they able to sum up the class content in their own words

– Are they willing to take up actions from now on? (without being forced)

– How has the class changed the way they saw things (open question)?

– How about the kids that completely disagree? How to make them understand in a way that’s praxis (opposed to the factory model)?

– Have I used the factory model or have I directed the kids towards critical thinking

 

      1. Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

I would know that the message was well conveyed when the kids will understand that hurt people do hurt, and that the current state of First Nations in general is simply a consequence of how they’ve been mistreated through history. Healing takes a long time and therefore requires grace and patience, they are not to blame since they have been taken into this vicious cycle of abuse.

 

      1. Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Warm-up, Focusing the Learning):    Time: 830-840

– Greet everyone and ask how their week is going.

– Show the first picture on the PowerPoint, asking them if they knew what that picture was.

– After the guess, ask what they know about residential schools.

– Let them understand that this would be today’s class

Development:     Time: 840-905


– Show them the PowerPoint (https://prezi.com/eyozdnxki-cb/edit/#20)

– List some of impact of residential schools today

. Individuals (isolation/alienation, shame, self-hatred, anger towards school and parents, racism, fear of authority, self-destructive behaviour).

. Family level (unresolved grief, difficulty with parenting effectively, family violence, loss of stories, loss of traditions, loss of identity)

. Community and Culture (lack of control over land and resources, increased suicide rate, lack of communal raising of children, lack of initiative, dependency on others, communal violence)

– Ask students for solutions. We’ve talked about what happened in residential schools and the way First Nations are still dealing with that, now what are some of the steps they think we could take to improve things? And have we already been taking those steps in Canada? Why or why not?

Learning Closure:                                          Time:905-910

– Ask two or three kids to sum up today’s lesson

– Ask them to put their belongings away for the class is over.

Materials/Equipment: Powerpoint

Management Strategies:

– If kids get too excited, ask them not to all speak at the same time but to raise their hand.

– If they are too quiet or uncomfortable, let them know that sometimes walking through uncomfortable zones brings growth and enlightment.

Safety Considerations:

– Let them know in advance that it is a touchy subject, so they should not feel offended or condemned. They are not responsible for their ancestors mistakes but they can contribute to the repair and healing of the nation.

Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation:

 

Stage 4: Reflection

Philosophy of education

Behind every school and every teacher is a set of related beliefs, a Teaching Philosophy that influences what and how students are taught. Throughout the ages, the world of education has been shaped by various types of philosophies, spanking a kid in class for instance that was accepted 100 years ago is not tolerated today anymore. Pupils nowadays spend more time with their teachers than even their own parents, which shows how key the role of a teacher is.

First of all I would like to highlight the fact that philosophies of  Education have been evolving with time, so will mine. The key I believe is to stay humble and teachable. I read somewhere that “the humble man makes room for progress, the proud man believes he is already there”. I believe that each person on earth has a specific destiny, has something to put on the table whether the person is into science, entertainment, or even arts.

My perspective is very much student-centered in a way that I promote creativity through imagination. I believe that a lot of students would do better when they are in an environment where imagination is encouraged. So many children find school dull, boring, I believe that communicating the excitement of imagining possibilities is a remedy.

As a teacher, I will be trying to encourage students to question their world, in other words to challenge common sense. I have noticed that a good percentage of the richest people on earth either dropped out of school at an early stage (either high school or first or second year of college), or went in a direction that was opposite to the crowd (taking high risks or simply challenging common sense). Today they are successful and have PHD holders working for them. The secret I have noticed is critical thinking and Imagination. The factory model of our education system can be a hindrance to creativity and innovation, so I will be encouraging my Students to ask questions and imagine. Practically I will be asking them questions such as “why are you guys in school? What is the purpose of school? Why wouldn’t you just stay home and learn from the Internet”? Or questions like “If money was not an issue (like you have all the money you need/want) and you know that you would be a success, what would you do (as a Career)”? The answer to such a question speaks of innate passions, inward desires, and I will encourage them to explore those. Or even questions like “If you could completely eradicate one problem in the world, what would it be?” then later “How would you go about it”? And many more.

I want them to leave the class with more than just 1+1=2.  Maxine Greene would say “part of teaching is helping people create themselves”. I also understand that we can only impart what we already have, reason why as a teacher I will be trying to walk in that kind of freedom myself beforehand.

Cemeteries are the richest places on earth because it is there that we find books that were never written, songs that were never sung, discoveries that were never shared, all because someone was too afraid to take that first step and to carry out their dreams. In other words I will be a gold digger in their lives.

 

 

Hebrew weekdays

Hebrew Weekdays

Apart from Saturday (Sabbath day), each day of the week in Hebrew has a number. Indeed, they are all from number one to number six. I sort of knew already that Saturday was Sabbath day, the day of rest and when every shop is closed in Israel, but I never knew that the Shabbat day did not really have a number. Also, Sabbath is the only day that does not start with “Yom”, every other day does. Thanks to the learning project, now I know.

Yom is indeed pronounced “Yome”. The “Kh” is a guttural sound often spelled as “Ch”.  There is no “Ch” sound in Hebrew as there is in English.  Modern Hebrew, however, can create a “Ch” sound by putting an accent mark ( ´ ) in front of the Hebrew letter “Khet” (or “Chet”).  This is used only in rare cases in order to properly pronounce such words or names as Church or Churchill (referring to the person Winston Churchill.)

Secular Weekday Name

Hebrew “Name”

Hebrew Meaning

Sunday Yom Reeshone First day
Monday Yom Shaynee Second day
Tuesday Yom Shlee´shee Third day
Wednesday Yom Revee´ee Fourth day
Thursday Yom Khah´mee´shee Fifth day
Friday Yom Ha´shee´shee Sixth day
Saturday Shabbat Rest

I hope I will be able to remember these words after two or three months, I guess maybe it will be a matter of practice. I wish I had a friend that speaks Hebrew, that way I won’t lose whatever I am learning right now. From what I understand too, Saturday is the most important day in the Hebrew week.

Teaching Philosophy

Behind every school and every teacher is a set of related beliefs, a teaching philosophy that influences what and how students are taught. Throughout the ages, the world of education has been shaped by various types of philosophies, spanking a child in class for instance that was accepted 100 years ago is not tolerated anymore. Pupils nowadays spend more time with their teachers than even their own parents, which shows how key the role of a teacher is.

First of all I would like to highlight the fact that philosophies of education have been evolving with time, so will mine. The key I believe is to stay humble and teachable. I read somewhere that “the humble man makes room for progress, the proud man believes he is already there”. I believe that each person on earth has a specific destiny, has something to put on the table whether the person is into science, entertainment, or even arts.

My perspective is very much student-centered in a way that I promote creativity through imagination. I believe that a lot of students would do better when they are in an environment where imagination is encouraged. So many children find school dull, boring, I believe that communicating the excitement of imagining possibilities is a remedy.

As a teacher, I will be trying to encourage students to question their world, in other words to challenge common sense. I have noticed that a good percentage of the richest people on earth either dropped out of school at an early stage (either high school or first or second year of college), or went in a direction that was opposite to the crowd (taking high risks or simply challenging common sense). Today they are successful and have PHD holders working for them. The secret I have noticed is critical thinking and imagination. The factory model of our education system can be a hindrance to creativity and innovation, so I will be encouraging my students to ask questions and imagine. Practically I will be asking them questions such as “why are you guys in school? What is the purpose of school? Why wouldn’t you just stay home and learn from the Internet”? Or questions like “If money was not an issue (like you have all the money you need/want) and you know that you would be a success, what would you do (as a career)”? The answer to such a question speaks of innate passions, inward desires, and I will encourage them to explore those. Or even questions like “If you could completely eradicate one problem in the world, what would it be?” then later “How would you go about it”? And many more.

I want them to leave the class with more than just 1+1=2. Maxine Greene would say “part of teaching is helping people create themselves”. I also understand that we can only impart what we already have, reason why as a teacher I will be trying to walk in that kind of freedom myself beforehand.

Cemeteries are the richest places on earth because it is there that we find books that were never written, songs that were never sung, discoveries that were never shared, all because someone was too afraid to take that first step and to carry out their dreams. In other words I will be a gold digger in their lives.

 

 

Kahoot!

Kahoot  is definitely one of my favourite  Free edtech tool. Used for formative assessments, I first came accross it in my ECS 200 class last semester. I am naturally very competitive so the fact that the game allows it very much stimulates me. The only thing I don’t like about it is the timeline element (while answering questions): one can answer a question well, but because they took longer than someone else, they would get less points. English is already not my first language, so I naturally take longer to read and understand the question asked. I would eventually get it right, but would get less point than someone who answered faster. That never impressed me to be honest.

Nevertheless as a teacher, I think it is a great formative tool. It requires less prep work and no wasting paper. Playing it right after a class is good because students tend to forget class content, but they rarely forget their Kawoot answers. I remember on my ECS 200 midterms, many questions that were on the Kahoot came back. I had not necessarily studied them but because I remembered my Kahoot answers, I was able to answer those midterm questions.

 

kahoot

I might be a big Kahoot fan, it is not always the case for everyone. Indeed, acording to the New Learning Times: “Only having four options might be a limitation, but you could also see it as a creative constraint. It was also not immediately clear how to play to begin a single-player game. Toggling between tabs in a single window for the game screen and answer board screen was annoying, and we would recommend having the answer board in a split screen window or on another device.” (https://newlearningtimes.com/cms/article/3214). As we can see like any other game,  Kahoot has its pros and cons.